The Sacred Writings of St. Ambrose

The Sacred Writings of St. Ambrose

Aurelius Ambrosius, better known in English as Saint Ambrose (c. between 337 and 340 – 4 April 397), was a bishop of Milan who became one of the most influential ecclesiastical figures of the 4th century. He was one of the four original doctors of the Church. (courtesy of wikipedia.com) This edition includes the following writings: On the Duties of the Clergy. Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy. Three Books on the Holy Spirit. The Two Books on the Decease of His Brother Saytrus. Exposition of the Christian Faith On the Mysteries. The Book Concerning the Mysteries. Two Books Concerning Repentance. Concerning Virgins. Three Books Concerning Virgins. The Treatise Concerning Widows. Selections from the Letters of St. Ambrose.

The Sacred Writings of St. Ambrose

The Sacred Writings of St. Ambrose

Format: Paperback.

The Sacred Writings of St. Ambrose.

ISBN: 9783849675370.

Available at amazon.com and other venues.

 

St. Ambrose’s theology (from wikipedia)

Ambrose ranks with Augustine, Jerome, and Gregory the Great, as one of the Latin Doctors of the Church. Theologians compare him with Hilary, who they claim fell short of Ambrose’s administrative excellence but demonstrated greater theological ability. He succeeded as a theologian despite his juridical training and his comparatively late handling of Biblical and doctrinal subjects.

Ambrose’s intense episcopal consciousness furthered the growing doctrine of the Church and its sacerdotal ministry, while the prevalent asceticism of the day, continuing the Stoic and Ciceronian training of his youth, enabled him to promulgate a lofty standard of Christian ethics. Thus we have the De officiis ministrorum, De viduis, De virginitate and De paenitentia.

Ambrose displayed a kind of liturgical flexibility that kept in mind that liturgy was a tool to serve people in worshiping God, and ought not to become a rigid entity that is invariable from place to place. His advice to Augustine of Hippo on this point was to follow local liturgical custom. „When I am at Rome, I fast on a Saturday; when I am at Milan, I do not. Follow the custom of the church where you are.“ Thus Ambrose refused to be drawn into a false conflict over which particular local church had the „right“ liturgical form where there was no substantial problem. His advice has remained in the English language as the saying, „When in Rome, do as the Romans do.“

One interpretation of Ambrose’s writings is that he was a Christian universalist. It has been noted that Ambrose’s theology was significantly influenced by that of Origen and Didymus the Blind, two other early Christian universalists. One quotation cited in favor of this belief:

Our Savior has appointed two kinds of resurrection in the Apocalypse. ‚Blessed is he that hath part in the first resurrection,‘ for such come to grace without the judgment. As for those who do not come to the first, but are reserved unto the second resurrection, these shall be disciplined until their appointed times, between the first and the second resurrection.
One could interpret this passage as being another example of the mainstream Christian belief in a general resurrection (both for those in heaven and for those in hell). Several other works by Ambrose clearly teach the mainstream view of salvation. For example:

The Jews feared to believe in manhood taken up into God, and therefore have lost the grace of redemption, because they reject that on which salvation depends.

 

(The text of the last section was taken from a Wikipedia entry and is available under the the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)

 

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