Archiv der Kategorie: Howells, William Dean

Italian Journeys

Italian Journeys – William Dean Howells

The “Italian Journeys” of Mr. Howells date from the year 1864, when the author was still our Consul at Venice, and had just taken the first step in his long, honorable career as a man of letters by the publication of Venetian Life. His excursions lead him not only from Venice as far as Belmont, but also through many highways and byways of the Italian peninsula, one foot in sea and one on shore, by Parma and Mantua, Bologna and Genoa, Padua, Ferrara and Arqua, to the more familiar environment of Rome and Naples. Since all travelling, as the ” sage observes, gives a return in proportion to the knowledge that a man brings … Read more.../Mehr lesen ...

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Venetian Life

Venetian Life – William Dean Howells

A large part of Howell’s time in Venice was given up to a critical study of life in that city, and in his “Venetian Life,” which appeared in 1866, he has given to the world the result of his observation and study. The book abounds in dainty pen pictures of the beauties of Venice ; as he tells us of the Grand canal, we can almost hear the dipping paddles of passing gondolas, and the barcarolle wafted on the evening breeze. It may seem almost sacrilege to lovers of the old legends, that he explains away the romanticism of the Doge’s palace, and denominates the Bridge of Sighs a ” pathetic swindle”. The book’s … Read more.../Mehr lesen ...

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Lives and Speeches of Abraham Lincoln and Hannibal Hamlin

Lives and Speeches of Abraham Lincoln and Hannibal Hamlin – William Dean Howells, John L. Hayes

“I wrote the life of Lincoln which elected him,” remarked William Dean Howells to Mark Twain in 1876. Howells had just contracted for a campaign biography of Rutherford B. Hayes and was humorously recalling the past to his friend. In 1860 Howells, then a young man of twenty-three, was working as an editorial writer on the Ohio State Journal at Columbus. Except for a book of poems, “The Lives and Speeches of Abraham Lincoln and Hannibal Hamlin” was the first of the one hundred and three books that Howells wrote during the years from 1860 to 1920. Though he attended neither high school nor Read more.../Mehr lesen ...

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