The History Of Scotland – Volume 3: From the early 17th century to the death of Dundee

The History Of Scotland – Volume 3: From the early 17th century to the death of Dundee – Andrew Lang

This is volume 3, covering the time from the early 17th century to the death of Dundee. In four volumes of more than 1500 combined pages the series „The History of Scotland“ deals with something less than two millenniums of Scottish history. Every single volume covers a certain period in an attempt to examine the elements and forces which were imperative to the making of the Scottish people, and to record the more important events of that time.

The History Of Scotland – Volume 3: From the early 17th century to the death of Dundee

The History Of Scotland – Volume 3: From the early 17th century to the death of Dundee

Format: Paperback.

The History Of Scotland – Volume 3: From the early 17th century to the death of Dundee.

ISBN: 9783849685645

Available at amazon.com and other venues.

 

Andrew Lang, the historian (from Wikipedia):

Lang’s writings on Scottish history are characterised by a scholarly care for detail, a piquant literary style, and a gift for disentangling complicated questions. The Mystery of Mary Stuart (1901) was a consideration of the fresh light thrown on Mary, Queen of Scots, by the Lennox manuscripts in the University Library, Cambridge, approving of her and criticising her accusers.

He also wrote monographs on The Portraits and Jewels of Mary Stuart (1906) and James VI and the Gowrie Mystery (1902). The somewhat unfavourable view of John Knox presented in his book John Knox and the Reformation (1905) aroused considerable controversy. He gave new information about the continental career of the Young Pretender in Pickle the Spy (1897), an account of Alestair Ruadh MacDonnell, whom he identified with Pickle, a notorious Hanoverian spy. This was followed by The Companions of Pickle (1898) and a monograph on Prince Charles Edward (1900). In 1900 he began a History of Scotland from the Roman Occupation (1900). The Valet’s Tragedy (1903), which takes its title from an essay on Dumas’s Man in the Iron Mask, collects twelve papers on historical mysteries, and A Monk of Fife (1896) is a fictitious narrative purporting to be written by a young Scot in France in 1429–1431.

 

(The text of the last section was taken from a Wikipedia entry and is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)

 

Publisher’s Note: This book is printed and distributed by Createspace a DBA of On-Demand Publishing LLC and is typically not available anywhere else than in stores owned and operated by Amazon or Createspace.

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