Dhammapada – Friedrich Max Müller

The Buddhist scripture called ‘The Dhammapada’ is traditionally ascribed to Buddha himself. It is an essential part of the Theravada canon.



Format: Paperback.


ISBN: 9783849673383.

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History of the Dhammapda (from wikipedia.com)

According to tradition, the Dhammapada’s verses were spoken by the Buddha on various occasions. „By distilling the complex models, theories, rhetorical style and sheer volume of the Buddha’s teachings into concise, crystalline verses, the Dhammapada makes the Buddhist way of life available to anyone…In fact, it is possible that the very source of the Dhammapada in the third century B.C.E. is traceable to the need of the early Buddhist communities in India to laicize the ascetic impetus of the Buddha’s original words.“ The text is part of the Khuddaka Nikaya of the Sutta Pitaka, although over half of the verses exist in other parts of the Pali Canon. A 4th or 5th century CE commentary attributed to Buddhaghosa includes 305 stories which give context to the verses.

Although the Pāli edition is the best-known, a number of other versions are known:

  • „Gāndhārī Dharmapada“ – a version possibly of Dharmaguptaka or Kāśyapīya origin in Gāndhārī written in Kharosthi script
  • „Patna Dharmapada“ – a version in Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit, most likely Sammatiya
    „Udānavarga“ – a seemingly related Mula-Sarvastivada or Sarvastivada text in3 Sanskrit versions
  • a Tibetan translation, which is popular in traditional Tibetan Buddhism
    „Mahāvastu“ – a Lokottaravada text with parallels to verses in the Pāli Dhammapada’s Sahassa Vagga and Bhikkhu Vagga.
  • „FaJuJing 法句经“ – 4 Chinese works; one of these appears to be an expanded translation of the Pali version; this has not traditionally been very popular.

Comparing the Pali Dhammapada, the Gandhari Dharmapada and the Udanavarga, Brough (2001) identifies that the texts have in common 330 to 340 verses, 16 chapter headings and an underlying structure. He suggests that the three texts have a „common ancestor“ but underlines that there is no evidence that any one of these three texts might have been the „primitive Dharmapada“ from which the other two evolved.

The Dhammapada is considered one of the most popular pieces of Theravada literature. A critical edition of the Dhammapada was produced by Danish scholar Viggo Fausbøll in 1855, becoming the first Pali text to receive this kind of examination by the European academic community.


(The text of the last section was taken from a Wikipedia entry and is available under the the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)


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