The Trumpet-Major

The Trumpet-Major – Thomas Hardy

The reader of Mr. Hardy’s novel, „The Trumpet Major,“ will at once ask himself, „Is not this author making a brave struggle against the scepticism, the pessimism that have been assailing him? Will not the optimism of the poet and idealist finally conquer the pessimism of the realist?“ If Mr. Hardy had died after writing „The Trumpet Major“ the last question might well have been answered in the affirmative. Few more charming, spontaneous, wholesome stories than this have ever been written by an English novelist. Sweet Anne Garland may well be set by Sweet Anne Page, and her two devoted swains, fickle Bob Loveday, the sailor, and staunch John Loveday, the Trumpet Major, are worthy to live as long as the language in which their adventures are told. This is the only one of Mr. Hardy’s stories that at all claims the title—the great title in spite of some modern critics—of an historical romance. The scene is laid on the southern coast of England during the exciting days of Napoleon’s contemplated invasion. The historical setting is worthy of all praise—indeed, as we shall see later, Mr. Hardy shares with Thackeray the power to move as freely in the past as in the present. We consider „The Trumpet Major“ to be the most charming of Mr. Hardy’s stories, and if all its characters had possessed the nobility of the unselfish hero and if its action had been more tense and pitched upon a higher plane it would easily have been his greatest work. As it is, it is one of the cleanest, most interesting, most wholesome stories that can be recommended to readers old or young.

The Trumpet-Major

The Trumpet-Major

Format: Paperback.

The Trumpet-Major.

ISBN: 9783849673307.

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Plot summary of the Trumpet-Major (from Wikipedia):

It’s 1804 and England expects an invasion attempt by Napoleon Bonaparte’s armies. Near Budmouth (Weymouth) Anne Garland lives with her widowed mother in part of a flour mill, next to their landlord and friend miller William Loveday. Thousands of soldiers pitch camp on the downs nearby, ready to meet the invasion. Anne attracts the admiration of two of them, both with local connections: Trumpet Major John Loveday, the decent and thoughtful son of the miller, and Yeomanry officer Festus Derriman, the boastful and aggressive nephew of the skinflint local squire. Anne favours John and loathes Festus, but Festus pesters her, a situation not helped by her mother’s desire for her to marry him on account of his rank and (assumed) wealth. However when her mother changes her view (partly due to the miller’s courting of her) and favours marriage to John, Anne changes her mind and favours Festus, thinking herself too ‘high’ for a miller’s son.

Into all this walks Bob Loveday, the miller’s younger son, home from a life in the merchant navy. Anne has a secret passion for him (they were childhood sweethearts), but he has brought home Matilda, a prospective bride whom he met just two weeks earlier in Southampton. John and Matilda recognise each other, and after a private conversation about her past she does a midnight flit. John tells Bob what’s happened, and although Bob understands, he can’t help resenting John’s intervention. Miller Loveday and Mrs Garland marry, John’s regiment moves away (with neither Anne, Bob nor Festus sorry to see him go), and Anne turns her focus to Bob. Anne plays hard to get with Bob, while Festus continues to pester her. She discovers that John sent Matilda away for honourable reasons (she’d previously thought he’d done it to elope with her), and writes him an apologetic letter, which he misinterprets as encouragement. Festus’s uncle insists on telling Anne where he’s hidden his will and other documents, but she drops the (cryptic) details in a field, where they’re found by a mysterious woman.

The invasion beacons are lit, although it’s a false alarm. In the chaos Festus almost has Anne at his mercy in an isolated cottage. She escapes and is found by John. He finds Festus and beats him, but drunken Festus thinks he’s Bob. John thinks he has a chance with Anne but discovers she’s with Bob, so to cover his embarrassment he pretends to be in love with an unnamed actress at the Budmouth theatre. Pressed to show Anne and Bob his sweetheart, John buys them tickets for the play, which is also attended by the King and Queen, who are staying in Budmouth. Matilda appears on stage, and John’s shocked expression is mistaken for passion. Festus, lurking as always, encounters Matilda (who is also the mysterious woman from earlier) out for a late-night walk. The press gang (naval recruiters who force men into service) are in town, and Festus and Matilda tip them off that Bob is an experienced sailor. The press gang come to the mill, but Bob escapes, with help from Matilda, who regrets her earlier action.

Bob, however, feels increasing guilty about not serving his country. Discovering that John still loves Anne tips the balance, and Bob persuades local man Captain Hardy (real-life captain of Nelson’s flagship, HMS Victory) to take him on board, thus doing his duty and leaving the way clear for John. Anne goes to Portland Head to watch the Victory sail past. In Budmouth she sits crying, and is comforted by the King, who is passing by. The Loveday family endure a long wait for news of the Victory, eventually hearing of the Battle of Trafalgar, but not whether Bob has survived. Finally a sailor comes to tell them that Bob is unharmed – but also that he’s engaged to a baker’s daughter in Portsmouth.

John sees his chance, but Anne rejects him. Meanwhile Festus discovers that John, not Bob, beat him up, and courts Matilda in the mistaken belief that this will upset John. Over a year or more, Anne begins to warm to John, and he is ecstatic – until a letter comes from Bob, saying he still wants Anne. John tries to be cold towards Anne, but this only makes her warmer towards him, until she virtually proposes to him, just as Bob, newly promoted to Naval Lieutenant, writes to say he’s coming home for her. Bob arrives and John withdraws. Anne rejects Bob, but he wears her down with his naval tales and fine uniform. However when he makes his big move, she rejects him again, and he storms out. Anne is worried that he’ll do something stupid, but is distracted by Squire Derriman, who arrives asking her to hide his deeds box, as Festus and his new fiancée Matilda are searching the house for it. She hides it in a window seat.

Bob returns in good temper; he’s been drinking with his new best friend, Festus. Anne yields to Bob, saying that if he can behave himself with the ladies for six months she’ll be his. Then it turns out that Festus is waiting outside; he comes in, Anne flees, and watching from a hole in the floor of the room above, sees Squire Derriman sneak in and try to retrieve the box. Festus catches him, but Bob intervenes. Derriman snatches the box and disappears, with Festus and Matilda in pursuit. The next morning Squire Derriman is found dead from exhaustion, but the box has disappeared. It’s eventually found hidden in Anne’s room. Derriman has left all his property to Anne, except for a few small houses which will provide Festus with a living, but not luxury.

Festus and Matilda are married, Anne and Bob are to be engaged, and John’s regiment is posted away to battle in Spain, where, we are told, he will die.

 

(The text of the last section was taken from a Wikipedia entry and is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)

 

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Franklin County, Ohio: A Collection Of Reminiscences Of The Early Settlement

Franklin County, Ohio: A Collection Of Reminiscences Of The Early Settlement – William T. Martin

It is the design of this book to preserve for the people of Franklin County an imperishable record of its early history — now existing only in scattering and detached papers and records, which are every year wasting away. To write the history of a single county, may to some appear like a very small business; while to others it is considered very desirable that someone should do so in every county. How else are the names and memory of our early settlers and friends to be preserved? And who is there that would not be pleased to look back, or to have his children look back, upon some record of his early days, and of departed friends? . It has been the writer’s object in this compilation, to give a correct statement of all events worthy of remembrance, with their proper dates, so as to form a book of ready reference, such as will be convenient and interesting to all residents of the county.

Franklin County, Ohio: A Collection Of Reminiscences Of The Early Settlement

Franklin County, Ohio: A Collection Of Reminiscences Of The Early Settlement

Format: Paperback.

Franklin County, Ohio: A Collection Of Reminiscences Of The Early Settlement.

ISBN: 9783849673291.

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Basics on Franklin County, Ohio (from Wikipedia):

Franklin County is a county in the U.S. state of Ohio. As of 2016 census estimates, the population was 1,264,518, making it the most populous county in Ohio. Its county seat is Columbus, the state capital and most populous city in Ohio. The county was established on April 30, 1803, less than two months after Ohio became a state, and was named after Benjamin Franklin. Franklin County originally extended all the way north to Lake Erie before Ohio subdivided further into more counties.

Franklin County is included in the Columbus, OH Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Franklin County, particularly Columbus, has been a centerpiece for presidential and congressional politics, most notably the 2000 presidential election, the 2004 presidential election, and the 2006 midterm elections. Franklin County is home to one of the largest universities in the United States, The Ohio State University, which as of fall 2014 has an enrollment of 58,322 students on its main Columbus campus.

 

(The text of the last section was taken from a Wikipedia entry and is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)

 

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Mental Fascination

Mental Fascination – William Walker Atkinson

This book is accompanying Atkinson’s main work entitled „The Secret of Mental Magic,“ and being in the nature of a sequel, supplement, or „side-light“ thereto. It is designed to bring out the details, and special features of several of the „lessons“ of which „The Secret of Mental Magic“ is composed; and to give something in the nature of Special Instruction regarding the actual operation or workings of the principles referred to in the lessons of my main work. The present manual bears the above mentioned relation to that lesson in my main work entitled „Personal Influence.“

Mental Fascination

Mental Fascination

Format: Paperback.

Mental Fascination.

ISBN: 9783849673284.

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Mental Science and New Thought (from Wikipedia):

Some time after his healing, William Walker Atkinson (a.k.a. Theron Q. Dumont) began to write articles on the truths he felt he had discovered, which were then known as Mental Science. In 1889, an article by him entitled „A Mental Science Catechism,“ appeared in Charles Fillmore’s new periodical, Modern Thought.

By the early 1890s Chicago had become a major centre for New Thought, mainly through the work of Emma Curtis Hopkins, and Atkinson decided to move there. Once in the city, he became an active promoter of the movement as an editor and author. He was responsible for publishing the magazines Suggestion (1900–1901), New Thought (1901–1905) and Advanced Thought (1906–1916).

In 1900 Atkinson worked as an associate editor of Suggestion, a New Thought Journal, and wrote his probable first book, Thought-Force in Business and Everyday Life, being a series of lessons in personal magnetism, psychic influence, thought-force, concentration, will-power, and practical mental science.

He then met Sydney Flower, a well-known New Thought publisher and businessman, and teamed up with him. In December, 1901 he assumed editorship of Flower’s popular New Thought magazine, a post which he held until 1905. During these years he built for himself an enduring place in the hearts of its readers. Article after article flowed from his pen. Meanwhile, he also founded his own Psychic Club and the so-called „Atkinson School of Mental Science“. Both were located in the same building as Flower’s Psychic Research and New Thought Publishing Company.

Atkinson was a past president of the International New Thought Alliance.

 

(The text of the last section was taken from a Wikipedia entry and is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)

 

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Veröffentlicht unter Mind Power (English) | Hinterlasse einen Kommentar

Essential Buddhist Discourses

Essential Buddhist Discourses – Henry Clarke Warren

This book contains the most important passages selected from the Buddhist Sacred Books. The aim of the present work is to take different ideas and conceptions found in Pâli writings, and present them to the reader in English. Translation has been the means employed as being the most effectual, and the order pursued is in the main that of the Buddhist „Three Jewels“ (in Pâli, Ti-Ratana), to wit, The Buddha, the Doctrine, and the Order. The selections of the first chapter are on The Buddha; next follow those which deal chiefly with the Doctrine; while others concerning the Order and secular life constitute the closing chapter of the book.

Essential Buddhist Discourses

Essential Buddhist Discourses

Format: Paperback.

Essential Buddhist Discourses.

ISBN: 9783849673277.

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Biography of Henry Clarke Warren (from wikipedia.com)

He was the second of four sons of Susan Cornelia Clarke (1825-1901) and Samuel Denis Warren (1817-1888), a wealthy paper manufacturer in Boston, who died in 1888.He had four siblings: Cornelia Lyman Warren, philanthropist; Samuel D. Warren (1854-1899), businessperson; Edward Perry Warren (1860-1928), art collector; Fredrick Fiske Warren (1862-1938), political radical and utopist. He graduated in 1879 with an A.B. from Harvard University, and followed it up with studies at Johns Hopkins University under Lanman and Maurice Bloomfield, and at Oxford University with T. W. Rhys Davids. He purchased the house of Charles Beck in 1891, and lived in it until his death in 1899 at which he bequeathed it, along with the bulk of his estate, to Harvard University; the building is now known as the Beck-Warren House (or Warren House).

His work Buddhism in Translation (1896) and translation (along with Dharmananda Damodar Kosambi) of the Visuddhimagga of Buddhaghosa (1950) respectively appeared as Volume 3 and Volume 41 of the Harvard Oriental Series.

 

(The text of the last section was taken from a Wikipedia entry and is available under the the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)

 

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The Book Of Ezekiel

The Book Of Ezekiel- James Hastings

Here is a gold mine for the preacher, the teacher and the father and mother in the home who have it in mind to inculcate sound teaching, based upon the Word of God, so that the boys and girls of the congregations, Sunday-Schools and households may be thoroughly rooted and grounded in the essentials of the Christian faith. There are many volumes in this series of short addresses and they cover the entire range of the Holy Scriptures, from Genesis to Revelation. The material gathered here is fresh and varied and there is just enough of it to furnish the groundwork of the preacher’s sermon, the Sunday school teacher’s talk and the parent’s reading and comment.

The Book Of Ezekiel

The Book Of Ezekiel

Format: Paperback.

The Book Of Ezekiel.

ISBN: 9783849673260.

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Biography of James Hastings (from wikipedia)

He was born in Huntly, Aberdeenshire, the second son and fifth child of local miller James Hastings. His initial education was undertaken at Huntly School and Aberdeen Grammar School. He studied classics at the University of Aberdeen, graduating with a Master’s degree in 1876. He then attended the Free Church Divinity College in Aberdeen in preparation for ordination as a Free Church minister. While studying at the college, he also worked as a teacher at Chanonry House School, a private school for boys in Old Aberdeen.

Following a period as assistant minister in Broughty Ferry, Dundee, Hastings was ordained in 1884, becoming minister at Kineff Free Church in Kincardineshire. After 13 years, he was called to Willison Church in Dundee, but returned to Kincardineshire in 1901, having struggled with his city placement. From 1901 until his retirement in 1911, he was the minister at the United Free Church in St Cyrus. During his period in office, he oversaw the erection of a new church building for the congregation.

In one obituary, his preaching was described as „evangelical in sentiment, thoughtful and expository in style, fluent in delivery, and fervent in application.“

Hastings married Ann Wilson Forsyth in 1884, the year of his ordination. They had two children: Edward (21 March 1890–1 August 1980) and Ann Wilson (21 April 1885–23 March 1975). Edward later also became a minister of the United Free Church.

He received honorary Doctor of Divinity degrees from the University of Aberdeen (1897) and Queen’s University in Nova Scotia (1920).

After his retirement, Hastings returned to Aberdeen, where he became a member of Beechgrove United Free Church. He died unexpectedly on 15 October 1922, survived by his wife and children. His funeral was held on 18 October, and he was buried at Springbank Cemetery in Aberdeen.

 

(The text of the last section was taken from a Wikipedia entry and is available under the the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)

 

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Veröffentlicht unter Children's Great Bible Texts, The Sacred Books (English) | Hinterlasse einen Kommentar

Gnostic John the Baptizer: Selections from the Mandaean John-Book

Gnostic John the Baptizer: Selections from the Mandaean John-Book – G. R. S. Mead

The main materials contained in these pages will certainly be new for the vast majority of readers. Moreover the Mandaean narratives, legends and discourses are not only interesting because of their own distinctive matter and manner, but they are also arresting; for they raise a number of problems, some of which are far-reaching and one is fraught with implications of immense importance. The definite solutions of these problems, however, lie in the future, and the most important of them will perhaps never be reached; for, in the absence of straightforward historical information, general agreement on any subject that concerns Christian origins immediately or even indirectly is now well-nigh a psychological impossibility.

Gnostic John the Baptizer: Selections from the Mandaean John-Book

Gnostic John the Baptizer: Selections from the Mandaean John-Book

Format: Paperback.

Gnostic John the Baptizer: Selections from the Mandaean John-Book.

ISBN: 9783849673253.

 

G. R. S. Mead and the Theosophical Society (from wikipedia.com)

While still at Cambridge University Mead read Esoteric Buddhism (1883) by Alfred Percy Sinnett. This comprehensive theosophical account of the Eastern religion prompted Mead to contact two theosophists in London named Bertam Keightly and Mohini Chatterji, which eventually led him to join Helena Petrovna Blavatsky’s Theosophical Society in 1884.

In 1889 he abandoned his teaching profession to become Blavatsky’s private secretary, and also became a joint-secretary of the Esoteric Section (E.S.) of the Theosophical Society, reserved for those deemed more advanced.

Mead received Blavatsky’s Six Esoteric Instructions and other teachings at 22 meetings headed by Blavatsky which were only attended by the Inner Group of the Theosophical Society. It was because of the intimacy Mead felt with the Inner Group that he married Laura Cooper in 1899.

Contributing intellectually to the Theosophical Society, at first most interested in Eastern religions, he quickly became more and more attracted to Western esotericism in religion and philosophy, particularly Neoplatonism, Gnosticism, and Hermeticism, although his scholarship and publications continued to engage with Eastern religion. Making many contributions to the Theosophical Society’s Lucifer as joint editor, he eventually became the sole editor of The Theosophical Review in 1907 (as Lucifer was renamed in 1897).

As of February 1909 Mead and some 700 members of the Theosophical Society’s British Section resigned in protest at Annie Besant’s reinstatement of Charles Webster Leadbeater to membership in the society. Leadbeater had been a prominent member of the Theosophical Society until he was accused in 1906 of teaching masturbation to the sons of some American Theosophists under the guise of occult training. While this prompted Mead’s resignation, his frustration at the dogmatism of the Theosophical Society may also have been a major contributor to his break after 25 years.

 

(The text of the last section was taken from a Wikipedia entry and is available under the the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)

 

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The Sacred Writings of Cyril of Jerusalem

The Sacred Writings of Cyril of Jerusalem – Cyril of Jerusalem

Cyril, bishop of Jerusalem, where he was probably born, was ordained a presbyter in 345, and had the instruction of the catechumens entrusted to him. In 350 he was elevated to the see of Jerusalem, and became deeply involved in the dogmatic controversies of his time. His metropolitan, Acacius of Caesarea, inclined to Arianism, while Cyril strongly espoused the Nicene creed and was, in consequence, deposed for a time. On the death of the emperor Constantine he was restored; but on the accession of Valens, an Arian emperor, he had once more to resign his post till the accession of Theodosius permitted him to return finally in peace in 379. This edition comprises his most important writings.

The Sacred Writings of Cyril of Jerusalem

The Sacred Writings of Cyril of Jerusalem

Format: Paperback.

The Sacred Writings of Cyril of Jerusalem

ISBN: 9783849673246.

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Cyril’s theological position (from wikipedia)

Though his theology was at first somewhat indefinite in phraseology, he undoubtedly gave a thorough adhesion to the Nicene Orthodoxy. Even if he did avoid the debatable term homoousios, he expressed its sense in many passages, which exclude equally Patripassianism, Sabellianism, and the formula „there was a time when the Son was not“ attributed to Arius. In other points he takes the ordinary ground of the Eastern Fathers, as in the emphasis he lays on the freedom of the will, the autexousion (αὐτεξούσιον), and in his view of the nature of sin. To him sin is the consequence of freedom, not a natural condition. The body is not the cause, but the instrument of sin. The remedy for it is repentance, on which he insists. Like many of the Eastern Fathers, he focuses on high moral living as essential to true Christianity. His doctrine of the Resurrection is not quite so realistic as that of other Fathers; but his conception of the Church is decidedly empirical: the existing Church form is the true one, intended by Christ, the completion of the Church of the Old Testament. His interpretation of the Eucharist is disputed. If he sometimes seems to approach the symbolic view, at other times he comes very close to a strong realistic doctrine. The bread and wine are not mere elements, but the body and blood of Christ.

Cyril’s writings are filled with the loving and forgiving nature of God which was somewhat uncommon during his time period. Cyril fills his writings with great lines of the healing power of forgiveness and the Holy Spirit, like “The Spirit comes gently and makes himself known by his fragrance. He is not felt as a burden for God is light, very light. Rays of light and knowledge stream before him as the Spirit approaches. The Spirit comes with the tenderness of a true friend to save, to heal, to teach, to counsel, to strengthen and to console”. Cyril himself followed God’s message of forgiveness many times throughout his life. This is most clearly seen in his two major exiles where Cyril was disgraced and forced to leave his position and his people behind. He never wrote or showed any ill will towards those who wronged him. Cyril stressed the themes of healing and regeneration in his catechesis.

 

(The text of the last section was taken from a Wikipedia entry and is available under the the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)

 

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The Sacred Writings of Saint Cyprian

The Sacred Writings of Saint Cyprian – Saint Cyprian

The Bishop of Carthage, one of the most illustrious in the early history of the church, and one of the most notable of its early martyrs, was born about the year 200, probably at Carthage. He was of patrician family, wealthy, highly educated, and for some time occupied as a teacher of rhetoric at Carthage. Of an enthusiastic temperament, accomplished in classical literature, he seems while a pagan to have courted discussion with the converts to Christianity. Confident in his own powers, he entered ardently into what was no doubt the great question of the time at Carthage as elsewhere. He sought to vanquish, but was himself vanquished by, the new religious force which was making such rapid inroads on the decaying paganism of the Roman empire. Caecilianus (or Caecilius), a presbyter of Carthage, is supposed to have been the instrument of his conversion, which seems to have taken place about 246. This edition contains all 82 epistles that the Bishop of Carthage wrote, as well as a big selection of his treatises.

The Sacred Writings of Saint Cyprian

The Sacred Writings of Saint Cyprian

Format: Paperback.

The Sacred Writings of Saint Cyprian

ISBN: 9783849673239.

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The writings of Saint Cyprian (from wikipedia)

St. Cyprian’s works were edited in volumes 3 and 4 of the Patrologia Latina. He was not a speculative theologian, his writings being always related to his pastoral ministry.[13] The first major work was a monologue spoken to a friend called Ad Donatum, detailing his own conversion, the corruption of Roman government and the gladiatorial spectacles, and pointing to prayer as „the only refuge of the Christian“.[5] Another early written work was the Testimonia ad Quirinum. During his exile from Carthage Cyprian wrote his most famous treatise, De Ecclesiae Catholicae Unitate (On the Unity of the Catholic Church) and on returning to his see, he issued De Lapsis (On the Fallen). Another important work is his Treatise on the Lord’s Prayer.

The following works are of doubtful authenticity: De spectaculis („On Public Games“); De bono pudicitiae („The Virtue of Modesty“); De idolorum vanitate („On the Vanity of Images,“ written by Novatian); De laude martyrii („In Praise of Martyrdom“); Adversus aleatores („Against Gamblers“); De duobus montibus Sina et Sion („On the Two Mountains Sinai and Sion“); Adversus Judaeos („Against the Jews“); and the Cena Cypriani („Cyprian’s Banquet“, which enjoyed wide circulation in the Middle Ages). The treatise entitled De duplici martyrio ad Fortunatum and attributed to Cyprian was not only published by Erasmus, but probably also composed by him. A number of grimoires, such as Libellus Magicus are also attributed to Cyprian. It is possible that his „Citation,“ was the only text written by him, a prayer for the help of angels against demonic attacks.

Doubtless only part of his written output has survived, and this must apply especially to his correspondence, of which some sixty letters are extant, in addition to some of the letters he received.

 

(The text of the last section was taken from a Wikipedia entry and is available under the the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)

 

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John Calvin’s Bible Commentaries On Jeremiah 20 – 29

John Calvin’s Bible Commentaries On Jeremiah 20 – 29 – John Calvin

The Commentaries On Jeremiah, like those on The Minor Prophets, were delivered as Lectures In The Theological School At Geneva, taken down by some of the Pupils, and afterwards read to Calvin, and corrected. We find in them the production of the same vigorous and expansive mind: The Divine Oracles are faithfully explained, the meaning is clearly stated, and such brief deductions are made as the subjects legitimately warrant. Though the Lectures were extemporaneously delivered, there is yet so much order preserved, and such brevity, clearness, and suitableness of diction are found in them, that in these respects they nearly equal the most finished compositions of Calvin as proof that he possessed a mind of no common order. The Ministry Of Jeremiah extended over a large space of time from the thirteenth year of Josiah’s reign till after the final overthrow of the nation; but for how long after that period, it is not known. fA1 Between the thirteenth year of Josiah and the destruction of the city and Temple, there were about forty years. This was a remarkable period, and Jeremiah nearly alone labored among the people. Their sins had been for the most part the same for a long time – for nearly two centuries, as it appears from the testimonies of his predecessors, Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, Joel, Micah, Nahum, and Zephaniah; for these seven had in this order preceded him. Zephaniah And Habakkuk were probably for a time his contemporaries, the first at the commencement, and the other near the end of his ministry.

John Calvin's Bible Commentaries On Jeremiah 20 - 29

John Calvin’s Bible Commentaries On Jeremiah 20 – 29

Format: Paperback.

John Calvin’s Bible Commentaries On Jeremiah 20 – 29.

ISBN: 9783849673222.

Available at amazon.com and other venues.

 

Biography of John Calvin (from wikipedia.com)

John Calvin (10 July 1509 – 27 May 1564) was an influential French theologian, pastor and reformer during the Protestant Reformation. He was a principal figure in the development of the system of Christian theology later called Calvinism, aspects of which include the doctrines of predestination and of the absolute sovereignty of God in salvation of the human soul from death and eternal damnation, in which doctrines Calvin was influenced by and elaborated upon the Augustinian and other early Christian traditions. Various Congregational, Reformed, and Presbyterian churches, which look to Calvin as the chief expositor of their beliefs, have spread throughout the world.

Calvin was a tireless polemic and apologetic writer who generated much controversy. He also exchanged cordial and supportive letters with many reformers, including Philipp Melanchthon and Heinrich Bullinger. In addition to his seminal Institutes of the Christian Religion, Calvin wrote commentaries on most books of the Bible, confessional documents, and various other theological treatises.

Originally trained as a humanist lawyer, he broke from the Roman Catholic Church around 1530. After religious tensions erupted in widespread deadly violence against Protestant Christians in France, Calvin fled to Basel, Switzerland, where in 1536 he published the first edition of the Institutes. In that same year, Calvin was recruited by Frenchman William Farel to help reform the church in Geneva, where he regularly preached sermons throughout the week; but the governing council of the city resisted the implementation of their ideas, and both men were expelled. At the invitation of Martin Bucer, Calvin proceeded to Strasbourg, where he became the minister of a church of French refugees. He continued to support the reform movement in Geneva, and in 1541 he was invited back to lead the church of the city.

Following his return, Calvin introduced new forms of church government and liturgy, despite opposition from several powerful families in the city who tried to curb his authority. During this period, Michael Servetus, a Spaniard regarded by both Roman Catholics and Protestants as having a heretical view of the Trinity, arrived in Geneva. He was denounced by Calvin and burned at the stake for heresy by the city council. Following an influx of supportive refugees and new elections to the city council, Calvin’s opponents were forced out. Calvin spent his final years promoting the Reformation both in Geneva and throughout Europe.

 

(The text of the last section was taken from a Wikipedia entry and is available under the the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)

 

Publisher’s Note: This book is printed and distributed by Createspace a DBA of On-Demand Publishing LLC and is typically not available anywhere else than in stores owned and operated by Amazon or Createspace.

Veröffentlicht unter Biblical Studies & Commentaries, The Sacred Books (English) | Hinterlasse einen Kommentar

John Calvin’s Bible Commentaries On Jeremiah 30 – 47

John Calvin’s Bible Commentaries On Jeremiah 30 – 47 – John Calvin

The Commentaries On Jeremiah, like those on The Minor Prophets, were delivered as Lectures In The Theological School At Geneva, taken down by some of the Pupils, and afterwards read to Calvin, and corrected. We find in them the production of the same vigorous and expansive mind: The Divine Oracles are faithfully explained, the meaning is clearly stated, and such brief deductions are made as the subjects legitimately warrant. Though the Lectures were extemporaneously delivered, there is yet so much order preserved, and such brevity, clearness, and suitableness of diction are found in them, that in these respects they nearly equal the most finished compositions of Calvin as proof that he possessed a mind of no common order. The Ministry Of Jeremiah extended over a large space of time from the thirteenth year of Josiah’s reign till after the final overthrow of the nation; but for how long after that period, it is not known. fA1 Between the thirteenth year of Josiah and the destruction of the city and Temple, there were about forty years. This was a remarkable period, and Jeremiah nearly alone labored among the people. Their sins had been for the most part the same for a long time – for nearly two centuries, as it appears from the testimonies of his predecessors, Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, Joel, Micah, Nahum, and Zephaniah; for these seven had in this order preceded him. Zephaniah And Habakkuk were probably for a time his contemporaries, the first at the commencement, and the other near the end of his ministry.

John Calvin's Bible Commentaries On Jeremiah 30 - 47

John Calvin’s Bible Commentaries On Jeremiah 30 – 47

Format: Paperback.

John Calvin’s Bible Commentaries On Jeremiah 30 – 47.

ISBN: 9783849673215.

Available at amazon.com and other venues.

 

Biography of John Calvin (from wikipedia.com)

John Calvin (10 July 1509 – 27 May 1564) was an influential French theologian, pastor and reformer during the Protestant Reformation. He was a principal figure in the development of the system of Christian theology later called Calvinism, aspects of which include the doctrines of predestination and of the absolute sovereignty of God in salvation of the human soul from death and eternal damnation, in which doctrines Calvin was influenced by and elaborated upon the Augustinian and other early Christian traditions. Various Congregational, Reformed, and Presbyterian churches, which look to Calvin as the chief expositor of their beliefs, have spread throughout the world.

Calvin was a tireless polemic and apologetic writer who generated much controversy. He also exchanged cordial and supportive letters with many reformers, including Philipp Melanchthon and Heinrich Bullinger. In addition to his seminal Institutes of the Christian Religion, Calvin wrote commentaries on most books of the Bible, confessional documents, and various other theological treatises.

Originally trained as a humanist lawyer, he broke from the Roman Catholic Church around 1530. After religious tensions erupted in widespread deadly violence against Protestant Christians in France, Calvin fled to Basel, Switzerland, where in 1536 he published the first edition of the Institutes. In that same year, Calvin was recruited by Frenchman William Farel to help reform the church in Geneva, where he regularly preached sermons throughout the week; but the governing council of the city resisted the implementation of their ideas, and both men were expelled. At the invitation of Martin Bucer, Calvin proceeded to Strasbourg, where he became the minister of a church of French refugees. He continued to support the reform movement in Geneva, and in 1541 he was invited back to lead the church of the city.

Following his return, Calvin introduced new forms of church government and liturgy, despite opposition from several powerful families in the city who tried to curb his authority. During this period, Michael Servetus, a Spaniard regarded by both Roman Catholics and Protestants as having a heretical view of the Trinity, arrived in Geneva. He was denounced by Calvin and burned at the stake for heresy by the city council. Following an influx of supportive refugees and new elections to the city council, Calvin’s opponents were forced out. Calvin spent his final years promoting the Reformation both in Geneva and throughout Europe.

 

(The text of the last section was taken from a Wikipedia entry and is available under the the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)

 

Publisher’s Note: This book is printed and distributed by Createspace a DBA of On-Demand Publishing LLC and is typically not available anywhere else than in stores owned and operated by Amazon or Createspace.

Veröffentlicht unter Biblical Studies & Commentaries, The Sacred Books (English) | Hinterlasse einen Kommentar