The War of the Worlds

The War of the Worlds – H. G. Wells

Mr. H. G. Wells wears his skeleton of scientific knowledge so palpably on the outside that the most erratic flights of his imagination are received with a docile hushfulness accorded to few of the inventive. In The War of the Worlds, with clean-cut, stirring language, he discusses the exquisite possibilities of a bombardment of London by the planet Mars. The outrage upon experience which, with the gravity of a Swift, he calls upon us to accept is so tremendous and far-reaching as to counteract the effect of humorous details and leave a sense of horror and baffled intelligence. Over a track of forty million miles, in obedience to predictions at Lick Observatory, are shot missiles, or cylinders, which on arrival unscrew from the inside and liberate living Martians, „bipeds with flimsy, silicious skeletons and feeble musculature,“ who generate a devastating Heat-Ray accompanied by puffs of green smoke, and from their gun-like tubes shower canisters of black gas. The Telegraph and the Times give fair warning, and a curate expostulates “ Why are these things permitted?“ but in vain. From the hail of projectiles there is safety only in the underground railway and the Thames, though the latter is scalding hot if one of the toadish, bedevil-fished “ bipeds“ dips into it so much as a foot. Just when, as a superfluous artillery man said, it threatens to be „up“ with humanity—no more “ blessed concerts,“ picture exhibits, or anything—and the strangers with the V-shaped mouths and oily brown skins, deprived of their accustomed excess of oxygen, are becoming inured to the increased weight of their bodies, they disappear, and are found piled, with their war machines …

The War of the Worlds

The War of the Worlds

Format: Paperback.

The War of the Worlds.

ISBN: 9783849673086.

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Plot summary of The War of the Worlds (from Wikipedia):

The Coming of the Martians

The narrative opens by stating that as humans on Earth busied themselves with their own endeavors during the 1890s, aliens on Mars began plotting an invasion of Earth to replenish their limited resources. In 1899 the narrator is invited to an astronomical observatory at Ottershaw where explosions are seen on the surface of planet Mars, creating much interest in the scientific community. Later, a „meteor“ lands on Horsell Common, near the unnamed narrator’s home in Woking, Surrey. He is among the first to discover that the object is an artificial cylinder that opens, disgorging Martians who are „big“ and „greyish“ with „oily brown skin“, „the size, perhaps, of a bear“, each with „two large dark-coloured eyes“, and lipless „V-shaped mouths“ which drip saliva and are surrounded by two „Gorgon groups of tentacles“. The narrator finds them „at once vital, intense, inhuman, crippled and monstrous“. They briefly emerge, have difficulty in coping with the Earth’s atmosphere and gravity, and rapidly retreat into their cylinder. A human deputation (which includes the astronomer Ogilvy) approaches the cylinder with a white flag, but the Martians incinerate them and others nearby with a heat-ray before beginning to assemble their machinery. Military forces arrive that night to surround the common, including Maxim guns. The population of Woking and the surrounding villages are reassured by the presence of the British Army. A tense day begins, with much anticipation of military action by the narrator.

After heavy firing from the common and damage to the town from the heat-ray which suddenly erupts in the late afternoon, the narrator takes his wife to safety in nearby Leatherhead, where his cousin lives, using a rented, two-wheeled horse cart; he then returns to Woking to return the cart when in the early morning hours, a violent thunderstorm erupts. On the road during the height of the storm, he has his first terrifying sight of a fast-moving Martian fighting-machine; in panic he crashes the horse cart, barely escaping detection. He discovers the Martians have assembled towering three-legged „fighting-machines“ (tripods), each armed with a heat-ray and a chemical weapon: the poisonous „black smoke“. These tripods have wiped out the army units positioned around the cylinder and attacked and destroyed most of Woking. Sheltering in his house, the narrator sees a fleeing artilleryman moving through his garden, who later tells the narrator of his experiences and mentions that another cylinder has landed between Woking and Leatherhead, cutting off the narrator from his wife. The two try to escape via Byfleet just after dawn, but are separated at the Shepperton to Weybridge Ferry during a Martian afternoon attack on Shepperton. One of the Martian fighting-machines is brought down in the River Thames by artillery as the narrator and countless others try to cross the river into Middlesex, as the Martians retreat back to their original crater. This gives the authorities precious hours to form a defence-line covering London. After the Martians‘ temporary repulse, the narrator is able to float down the Thames in a boat toward London, stopping at Walton, where he first encounters the curate, his companion for the coming weeks.

Towards dusk, the Martians renew their offensive, breaking through the defence-line of siege guns and field artillery centred on Richmond Hill and Kingston Hill by a widespread bombardment of the black smoke; an exodus of the population of London begins. This includes the narrator’s younger brother, a medical student, also unnamed, who flees to the Essex coast after the sudden, panicked, predawn order to evacuate London is given by the authorities, a terrifying and harrowing journey of three days, amongst thousands of similar refugees streaming from London. The brother encounters Mrs. Elphinstone and her younger sister-in-law, just in time to help them fend off three men who are trying to rob them. Since Mrs. Elphinstone’s husband is missing, the three continue on together. After a terrifying struggle to cross a streaming mass of refugees on the road at Barnet, they head eastward. Two days later, at Chelmsford, their pony is confiscated for food by the local Committee of Public Supply. They press on to Tillingham and the sea. There they manage to buy passage to Continental Europe on a small paddle steamer, part of a vast throng of shipping gathered off the Essex coast to evacuate refugees. The torpedo ram HMS Thunder Child destroys two attacking tripods before being destroyed by the Martians, though this allows the evacuation fleet to escape, including the ship carrying the narrator’s brother and his two travelling companions. Shortly thereafter, all organised resistance has ceased, and the Martians roam the shattered landscape unhindered.

The Earth under the Martians

At the beginning of Book Two the narrator and the curate are plundering houses in search of food. During this excursion the men witness a Martian fighting-machine enter Kew, seizing any person it finds and tossing them into a „great metallic carrier which projected behind him, much as a workman’s basket hangs over his shoulder“, and the narrator realises that the Martian invaders may have „a purpose other than destruction“ for their victims. At a house in Sheen „a blinding glare of green light“ and a loud concussion attend the arrival of the fifth Martian cylinder, and both men are trapped beneath the ruins for two weeks. The narrator’s relations with the curate deteriorate over time, and he eventually is forced to knock him unconscious to silence his now loud ranting; but the curate is overheard outside by a Martian, who finally removes his unconscious body with one of its handling machine tentacles. The reader is then led to believe the Martians will perform a fatal transfusion of the curate’s blood to nourish themselves, as they have done with other captured victims viewed by the narrator through a small slot in the house’s ruins. The narrator just barely escapes detection from the returned foraging tentacle by hiding in the adjacent coal-cellar.

The Martians eventually abandon the cylinder’s crater, and the narrator emerges from the collapsed house where he had observed the Martians up close during his ordeal; he then approaches West London. En route, he finds the Martian red weed everywhere, a prickly vegetation spreading wherever there is abundant water. On Putney Heath, he once again encounters the artilleryman, who briefly persuades him of a grandiose plan to rebuild civilisation by living underground; but, after a few hours, the narrator perceives the laziness of his companion and abandons him. Now in a deserted and silent London, he begins to slowly go mad from his accumulated trauma, finally attempting to end it all by openly approaching a stationary fighting-machine. To his surprise, he quickly discovers that all the Martians have been killed by an onslaught of earthly pathogens, to which they had no immunity: „slain, after all man’s devices had failed, by the humblest things that God, in his wisdom, has put upon this earth“. The narrator continues on, finally suffering a brief but complete nervous breakdown, which affects him for days; he is finally nursed back to health by a kind family. Eventually, he is able to return by train to Woking via a patchwork of newly repaired tracks. At his home, he discovers that his beloved wife has miraculously survived. The last chapter reflects on the significance of the Martian invasion and the „abiding sense of doubt and insecurity“ it has left in the narrator’s mind.

 

(The text of the last section was taken from a Wikipedia entry and is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)

 

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Three Sunsets And Other Poems

Three Sunsets And Other Poems – Lewis Carroll

This book contains the following poems by the famous author:

Three Sunsets.
The Path Of Roses.
The Valley Of The Shadow Of Death.
Solitude.
Far Away.
Beatrice.
Stolen Waters.
The Willow-Tree.
Only A Woman’s Hair.
The Sailor’s Wife.
After Three Days.
Faces In The Fire.
A Lesson In Latin.
Puck Lost And Found.
A Song Of Love.

Three Sunsets And Other Poems

Three Sunsets And Other Poems

Format: Paperback.

Three Sunsets And Other Poems.

ISBN: 9783849673079.

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A short biography of Lewis Carroll (from Wikipedia):

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll, was an English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon, and photographer. His most famous writings are Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, its sequel Through the Looking-Glass, which includes the poem „Jabberwocky“, and the poem The Hunting of the Snark – all examples of the genre of literary nonsense. He is noted for his facility at word play, logic and fantasy. There are societies in many parts of the world dedicated to the enjoyment and promotion of his works and the investigation of his life.

 

(The text of the last section was taken from a Wikipedia entry and is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)

 

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The Book Of Saints And Heroes

The Book Of Saints And Heroes – Andrew Lang

A noted non-Catholic writer on pedagogical subjects stated some time ago that if his own religious body had the wealth of story contained in the lives of the saints of the Catholic Church, it would be abundantly supplied with religious literature for children. It is true that the lives of the saints are an inexhaustible treasure-house for all that will interest and stimulate children; and that the same treasure-house is too seldom drawn upon. Its riches are, comparatively speaking, little known to our children or, indeed, to our older folks. A book that taps this vein of Catholic inheritance is: The Book of Saints and Heroes, by Mrs. Lang, and edited by the late Andrew Lang. Needless to say the work is admirably well written, and no child, even though tired, would think of sleep while the story of Jerome and the Lion, or Francis and the Wolf of Agobio, was being read. Here is all that will arouse the imagination, fascinate the mind, and instill that romantic love of heroic deeds which, in turn, is so powerful a stimulus to virtue. The book is most richly and tastefully illustrated with page drawings, many of them beautifully colored. The author has combined legend and history, and has sought to give us an interesting story book.

The Book Of Saints And Heroes

The Book Of Saints And Heroes

Format: Paperback.

The Book Of Saints And Heroes.

ISBN: 9783849673062.

Available at amazon.com and other venues.

 

Andrew Lang’s Fairy Books (from Wikipedia):

Andrew Lang’s Fairy Books are a series of twenty-five collections of true and fictional stories for children, published between 1889 and 1913. The best known books of the series are the twelve collections of fairy tales, known as Andrew Lang’s „Coloured“ Fairy Books or Andrew Lang’s Fairy Books of Many Colors. In all, the volumes feature 798 stories, besides the 153 poems in The Blue Poetry Book.

Andrew Lang (1844–1912) was a Scots poet, novelist, and literary critic. As acknowledged in the prefaces, although Lang himself made most of the selections, his wife and other translators did a large portion of the translating and retelling of the actual stories. Four of the later volumes (from 1908 to 1912) were published as by „Mrs. Lang“.

According to Anita Silvey, „The irony of Lang’s life and work is that although he wrote for a profession—literary criticism; fiction; poems; books and articles on anthropology, mythology, history, and travel … he is best recognized for the works he did not write.“

The twelve Coloured Fairy Books were illustrated by H. J. Ford (Henry Justice Ford), the first two volumes shared with G. P. Jacomb-Hood and Lancelot Speed respectively, the sequels alone. Several other volumes were illustrated by Ford.

 

(The text of the last section was taken from a Wikipedia entry and is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)

 

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The Hidden Church of the Holy Graal

The Hidden Church of the Holy Graal – Arthur Edward Waite

The reader who would reach to motives and inspirations, who would seek to understand the subtle and secret forces that have moved all history, it would be difiicult to name a work of greater interest or value than this. To the rarer reader who has come upon traces of an undying tradition–a Hidden Church or Wisdom–the book will be a very revelation. The Graal legend, even as it is known to the general reader, woven into the Arthurian epic, is one of rarest beauty and most profound meaning. But when its rich symbolism is revealed in full, the signicance of the great quest, in the which pure-miuded and self-sacricing valor is alone successful—the ‚magnitude of meaning is made evident. Perhaps no other man living is so well fitted as Mr. Waite to approach this subject. Under the ruder methods of materialistic critics the delicate beauty and subtle meanings would be lost. Our author combines the grasp of scholarship with the sympathetic attitude and the deep-lying knowledge of hidden things.

The Hidden Church of the Holy Graal

The Hidden Church of the Holy Graal

Format: Paperback.

The Hidden Church of the Holy Graal.

ISBN: 9783849673055.

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Waite and the Order of the Golden Dawn (from wikipedia.com)

Waite joined the Outer Order of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn in January 1891 after being introduced by E.W. Berridge. In 1893 he withdrew from the Golden Dawn. In 1896 he rejoined the Outer Order of the Golden Dawn. In 1899 he entered the Second order of the Golden Dawn. He became a Freemason in 1901, and entered the Societas Rosicruciana in Anglia in 1902. In 1903 Waite founded the Independent and Rectified Order R. R. et A. C. This Order was disbanded in 1914. The Golden Dawn was torn by internal feuding until Waite’s departure in 1914; in July 1915 he formed the Fellowship of the Rosy Cross, not to be confused with the Societas Rosicruciana. By that time there existed some half-dozen offshoots from the original Golden Dawn, and as a whole it never recovered.

Aleister Crowley, Waite’s foe, referred to him as the villainous „Arthwate“ in his novel Moonchild and referred to him as „Dead Waite“ in his magazine Equinox. Lovecraft has a villainous wizard in his short story „The Thing on the Doorstep“ called Ephraim Waite; according to Robert M. Price, this character was based on Waite.

 

(The text of the last section was taken from a Wikipedia entry and is available under the the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)

 

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Veröffentlicht unter Mysticism, The Sacred Books (English) | Hinterlasse einen Kommentar

Centennial History of Columbus and Franklin County

Centennial History of Columbus and Franklin County – William Alexander Taylor

Columbus is the state capital and the most populous city of the U.S. state of Ohio, as well as the county seat of Franklin County. Named for explorer Christopher Columbus, the city was founded in 1812 at the confluence of the Scioto and Olentangy rivers, and assumed the functions of state capital in 1816. This is a full account of the history of this beautiful towns, of Franklin county and its various townships and includes a huge and thoroughly investigated biographical section.

Centennial History of Columbus and Franklin County

Centennial History of Columbus and Franklin County

Format: Paperback.

Centennial History of Columbus and Franklin County.

ISBN: 9783849673543.

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Basics on Columbus (from Wikipedia):

Columbus is the state capital and the most populous city in Ohio. It is the 14th-most populous city in the United States, with a population of 860,090 as of 2016 estimates. This makes Columbus the 3rd-most populous state capital in the United States after Phoenix, Arizona and Austin, Texas, and the second-most populous city in the Midwestern United States, after Chicago. It is the core city of the Columbus, Ohio, Metropolitan Statistical Area, which encompasses ten counties. With a population of 2,021,632, it is Ohio’s third-largest metropolitan area.

Columbus is the county seat of Franklin County. The city proper has also expanded and annexed portions of adjoining Delaware County and Fairfield County. Named for explorer Christopher Columbus, the city was founded in 1812 at the confluence of the Scioto and Olentangy rivers, and assumed the functions of state capital in 1816.

The city has a diverse economy based on education, government, insurance, banking, defense, aviation, food, clothes, logistics, steel, energy, medical research, health care, hospitality, retail, and technology. Columbus is home to the Battelle Memorial Institute, the world’s largest private research and development foundation; Chemical Abstracts Service, the world’s largest clearinghouse of chemical information; NetJets, the world’s largest fractional ownership jet aircraft fleet; and The Ohio State University, one of the largest universities in the United States. As of 2013, the city has the headquarters of five corporations in the U.S. Fortune 500: Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company, American Electric Power, L Brands, Big Lots, and Cardinal Health. The food service corporations Wendy’s, Donatos Pizza, Bob Evans, Max & Erma’s and White Castle and the nationally known companies Red Roof Inn, Rogue Fitness, and Safelite are also based in the metropolitan area.

 

(The text of the last section was taken from a Wikipedia entry and is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)

 

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A Child’s Life Of Christ

A Child’s Life Of Christ – Hesba Stretton

This book is merely the story of the life and death of our Lord. It has been written for those who have not the leisure, or the books, needed for threading together the fragmentary and scattered incidents recorded in the Four Gospels. These records have been searched diligently for the smallest links, which might serve to complete the chain of those years passed amongst us by One who called himself the Son of man, and did not refuse to be called the Son of God. The great mystery that surrounds Christ is left untouched. Neither love nor thought of ours can reach the heart of it, whilst still we see him as through a glass darkly. When we behold him as he is, face to face, then, and only then, shall we know fully what he was, and what he did for us. Whilst we strain our eyes to catch the mysterious vision, but dimly visible, we are in danger of becoming blind to that human, simple, homely life, spent amongst us as the pattern of our days. Happy they who are content with being known of God.

A Child's Life Of Christ

A Child’s Life Of Christ

Format: Paperback.

A Child’s Life Of Christ.

ISBN: 9783849673536.

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Stretton’s writing (from wikipedia.com)

‚Heba Stretton‘ was the pen name of Sarah Smith, one of the most popular Evangelical writers of the 19th century, who used her „Christian principles as a protest against specific social evils in her children’s books.“ Her moral tales and semi-religious stories, chiefly for the young, were printed in huge numbers and often chosen as school and Sunday-school prizes. She became a regular contributor to Household Words and All the Year Round under Charles Dickens’s editorship, after her sister had successfully submitted a story of hers without her knowledge. Altogether she wrote more than 40 novels.

The book that won widespread fame for „Hesbah Stretton“ was Jessica’s First Prayer, first published in the journal Sunday at Home in 1866 and the following year in book form. By the end of the 19th century it had sold at least a million and a half copies. Critic Brian Alderson notes that its sales were „nearly ten times as many as those of Alice in Wonderland.“ The book gave rise to a genre of stories about homeless children „that successfully combined elements of the sensational novel and the religious tract and helped introduce the image of the poor, urban child into the Victorian social conscious.“ It has been published in the United States as part of the Lamplighter Family Collection, under the title Jessica’s Journey.

A sequel, Jessica’s Mother, was published in Sunday at Home in 1866 and as a book in 1904. Jessica is a homeless girl in Victorian London, abandoned by an alcoholic actress mother, but who finds comfort and religious support in a friendship with Daniel Standring, owner of a coffee stall. She appears as a child actress, but when she becomes too big for such parts, she is beaten by her mother, receives little to eat, and wanders about London. The act of humanity by Standring, a chapel keeper in a Methodist chapel, helps him too, by re-evaluating his concept of religion and respectability.

Smith became the chief writer for the Religious Tract Society. Her experience of working with slum children in Manchester in the 1860s gave her books a greater sense of authenticity, for they „drive home the abject state of the poor with almost brutal force.“

 

(The text of the last section was taken from a Wikipedia entry and is available under the the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)

 

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Veröffentlicht unter Christology, The Sacred Books (English) | Hinterlasse einen Kommentar

Rime Of The Ancient Mariner

Rime Of The Ancient Mariner – Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Of all Mr. Coleridge’s productions, the Ancient Mariner is the only one that we could with confidence put into any person’s hands, on whom we wished to impress a favourable idea of his extraordinary powers. Let whatever other objections be made to it, it is unquestionably a work of genius—of wild, irregular, overwhelming imagination, and has that rich, varied movement in the verse, which gives a distant idea of the lofty or changeful tones of Mr. Coleridge’s voice.

Rime Of The Ancient Mariner

Rime Of The Ancient Mariner

Format: Paperback.

Rime Of The Ancient Mariner.

ISBN: 9783849673529.

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Coleridge’s comments to his masterpiece (from wikipedia)

In Biographia Literaria, Coleridge wrote:

The thought suggested itself (to which of us I do not recollect) that a series of poems might be composed of two sorts. In the one, incidents and agents were to be, in part at least, supernatural, and the excellence aimed at was to consist in the interesting of the affections by the dramatic truth of such emotions, as would naturally accompany such situations, supposing them real. And real in this sense they have been to every human being who, from whatever source of delusion, has at any time believed himself under supernatural agency. For the second class, subjects were to be chosen from ordinary life…In this idea originated the plan of the ‚Lyrical Ballads‘; in which it was agreed, that my endeavours should be directed to persons and characters supernatural, or at least Romantic; yet so as to transfer from our inward nature a human interest and a semblance of truth sufficient to procure for these shadows of imagination that willing suspension of disbelief for the moment, which constitutes poetic faith. … With this view I wrote the ‚Ancient Mariner‘.

In Table Talk, Coleridge wrote:

Mrs Barbauld once told me that she admired The Ancient Mariner very much, but that there were two faults in it — it was improbable, and had no moral. As for the probability, I owned that that might admit some question; but as to the want of a moral, I told her that in my own judgement the poem had too much; and that the only, or chief fault, if I might say so, was the obtrusion of the moral sentiment so openly on the reader as a principle or cause of action in a work of such pure imagination. It ought to have had no more moral than the Arabian Nights‘ tale of the merchant’s sitting down to eat dates by the side of a well, and throwing the shells aside, and lo! a genie starts up, and says he must kill the aforesaid merchant, because one of the date shells had, it seems, put out the eye of the genie’s son.

 

(The text of the last section was taken from a Wikipedia entry and is available under the the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)

 

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Die Piccolomini / The Piccolomini

Die Piccolomini / The Piccolomini – Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Friedrich Schiller

This is the second part of the Wallenstein trilogy by German playwright and mastermind Friedrich Schiller. The work as a whole produced a profound impression, and it is certainly Schiller’s masterpiece in dramatic literature. He brings out with extraordinary vividness the ascendency of Wallenstein over the wild troops whom he has gathered around him, and at the same time we are made to see how the mighty general’s schemes must necessarily end in ruin, not merely because a plot against him is skilfully prepared by vigilant enemies, but because he himself is lulled into a sense of security by superstitious belief in his supposed destiny as revealed to him by the stars. Wallenstein is the most subtle and complex of Schiller’s dramatic conceptions, and it taxes the powers of the greatest actors to present an adequate rendering of the motives which explain his strange and dark career. The love-story of Max Piccolomini and Thekla is in its own way not less impressive than the story of Wallenstein with which it is interwoven.

This is the bilingual edition of this literary masterpiece including the English and German versions of the play.

Die Piccolomini / The Piccolomini

Die Piccolomini / The Piccolomini

Format: Paperback.

Die Piccolomini / The Piccolomini.

ISBN: 9783849673512.

Available at amazon.com and other venues.

 

Plot summary of The Piccolomini (from wikipedia)

The main action of the trilogy begins with the second play. The viewpoint changes from that of the ordinary soldiers to that of the commanders who, awaiting orders, meet in an encampment near Pilsen. Most of them prefer Prince Wallenstein to the emperor. The former has repeatedly ignored the latter’s orders, which is why he has ordered the prince to cede part of his huge army. Unwilling, Wallenstein considers resignation and, to pressure the emperor into making peace, is secretly negotiating with the Swedish enemy. Spurring him on are his closest comrades, his brother-in-law Terzky and Illo, who scheme to get all the commanders to sign a document pledging their loyalty to Wallenstein. This document purports to have a proviso making the signatories‘ loyalty to Wallenstein subsidiary to their loyalty to the emperor, but Terzky and Illo secretly remove that proviso from the copy the signatories actually sign.

Wallenstein lets his comrades in on his plans but – unknown to him – one of them, Octavio Piccolomini, remains loyal to the emperor, for whom he is spying.[2] The emperor has authorised Piccolomini to replace Wallenstein as commander-in-chief, but Piccolomini decides to do so only if Wallenstein takes an open stand against the emperor. Imperial informers having managed to capture one of Wallenstein’s negotiators en route to the Swedes, his removal becomes imminent. The situation comes to a head because Octavio’s son Max Piccolomini (a fictional creation by Schiller) and Wallenstein’s daughter Thekla (a historical character) are in love. A devotee of Wallenstein, who treats him well, Max can’t believe his father’s claim that Wallenstein intends to betray the emperor. „Piccolomini“ ends with Max’s decision to challenge Wallenstein directly about his plans.

 

(The text of the last section was taken from a Wikipedia entry and is available under the the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)

 

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The Letters Volume 2

The Letters Volume 2 – Samuel Taylor Coleridge

This edition, originally published in 1895, has been one of the first attempts made to publish a collection of Coleridge’s letters. The selection has been made from a great mass of correspondence, written to his family, to Southey, De Quincey and other literary contemporaries. The letters are arranged in chronological order, and are intended rather to illustrate the story of the writer’s life than to embody his critical opinions, or to record the development of his philosophlcal and theological speculations. The sole criterium in the selection has been the letters‘ interest. A page of authorities is also given. This is volume 2 out of 2.

The Letters Volume 2

The Letters Volume 2

Format: Paperback.

The Letters Volume 2.

ISBN: 9783849673505.

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Biography of Samuel Taylor Coleridge (from wikipedia)

Samuel Taylor Coleridge was an English poet, literary critic, philosopher and theologian who, with his friend William Wordsworth, was a founder of the Romantic Movement in England and a member of the Lake Poets. He wrote the poems The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Kubla Khan, as well as the major prose work Biographia Literaria. His critical work, especially on William Shakespeare, was highly influential, and he helped introduce German idealist philosophy to English-speaking culture. Coleridge coined many familiar words and phrases, including suspension of disbelief. He had a major influence on Ralph Waldo Emerson and on American transcendentalism.

Throughout his adult life Coleridge had crippling bouts of anxiety and depression; it has been speculated that he had bipolar disorder, which had not been defined during his lifetime. He was physically unhealthy, which may have stemmed from a bout of rheumatic fever and other childhood illnesses. He was treated for these conditions with laudanum, which fostered a lifelong opium addiction.

 

(The text of the last section was taken from a Wikipedia entry and is available under the the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)

 

Publisher’s Note: This book is printed and distributed by Createspace a DBA of On-Demand Publishing LLC and is typically not available anywhere else than in stores owned and operated by Amazon or Createspace.

Veröffentlicht unter Classics of Fiction (English), Coleridge, Samuel Taylor | Hinterlasse einen Kommentar

The Letters Volume 1

The Letters Volume 1 – Samuel Taylor Coleridge

This edition, originally published in 1895, has been one of the first attempts made to publish a collection of Coleridge’s letters. The selection has been made from a great mass of correspondence, written to his family, to Southey, De Quincey and other literary contemporaries. The letters are arranged in chronological order, and are intended rather to illustrate the story of the writer’s life than to embody his critical opinions, or to record the development of his philosophlcal and theological speculations. The sole criterium in the selection has been the letters‘ interest. A page of authorities is also given. This is volume 1 out of 2.

The Letters Volume 1

The Letters Volume 1

Format: Paperback.

The Letters Volume 1.

ISBN: 9783849673499.

Available at amazon.com and other venues.

 

Biography of Samuel Taylor Coleridge (from wikipedia)

Samuel Taylor Coleridge was an English poet, literary critic, philosopher and theologian who, with his friend William Wordsworth, was a founder of the Romantic Movement in England and a member of the Lake Poets. He wrote the poems The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Kubla Khan, as well as the major prose work Biographia Literaria. His critical work, especially on William Shakespeare, was highly influential, and he helped introduce German idealist philosophy to English-speaking culture. Coleridge coined many familiar words and phrases, including suspension of disbelief. He had a major influence on Ralph Waldo Emerson and on American transcendentalism.

Throughout his adult life Coleridge had crippling bouts of anxiety and depression; it has been speculated that he had bipolar disorder, which had not been defined during his lifetime. He was physically unhealthy, which may have stemmed from a bout of rheumatic fever and other childhood illnesses. He was treated for these conditions with laudanum, which fostered a lifelong opium addiction.

 

(The text of the last section was taken from a Wikipedia entry and is available under the the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.)

 

Publisher’s Note: This book is printed and distributed by Createspace a DBA of On-Demand Publishing LLC and is typically not available anywhere else than in stores owned and operated by Amazon or Createspace.

Veröffentlicht unter Classics of Fiction (English), Coleridge, Samuel Taylor | Hinterlasse einen Kommentar